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Indy Ploy

“We do not follow maps to buried treasure and X never, ever marks the spot.”


Obsessed with Catch 22 and the madness of war. Lets reblog some stuff. Like a lot of stuff, no real theme here.
Jul 30 '14
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Last Crew Member of the Enola Gay
The Enola Gay* was 31,000 feet above Hiroshima on August 6, 1945 at 8:15 a.m. when it released its payload - “Little Boy,” the first atomic bomb. After dropping the bomb, the pilot, Colonel Paul Tibbets, turned the plane and headed back to base in the Mariana Islands.
The crew was told that they had 43 seconds to leave the area before the bomb detonated 1,890 feet in the air over the city of 350,000. Navigator Theodore “Dutch” Van Kirk began counting in his head (“one one-thousand”, “two one-thousand”) and at 43 there was nothing. He and his crew mates thought it was dud. 
Then the cabin filled with a bright light and the "plane jumped and made a sound like sheet metal snapping." Looking back he saw that Hiroshima was no longer visible, "The entire city was covered with smoke and dust and dirt. I describe it looking like a pot of black, boiling tar. You could see some fires burning on the edge of the city.”
Chosen as a military target housing several divisions of the Japanese army as well as serving as a key shipping port, an estimated 70-80,000 residents of Hiroshima were killed by the blast or resultant fires. Another 70,000 men, women, and children were injured. (Thousands later died of radiation poisoning or radiation-related illnesses.) 
Three days later another plane dropped a second atomic bomb (“Fat Man”)  on the city of Nagasaki. The Japanese surrendered that same day. (The official surrender occured on September 1, 1945.)
Mr. Van Kirk joined the Army Air Corps cadet program (a precursor to the U.S. Air Force Academy) just two months before the Japanese bombing at Pearl Harbor. Following his training, he was recruited by Colonel Tibbets as navigator, along with Major Thomas Ferebee as bombadier. 
Together the threesome flew 58 missions during World War II. This included transporting General Dwight Eisenhower to Gibraltar in 1942 for the planning of the Allied invasion of North Africa.
Mr. Van Kirk was reassigned stateside as a training officer after mission 58 but Colonel Tibbets recalled him as part of the newly created 509th Composite Group. The group was formed to specifically handle the transport and delivery of the atomic bomb.
Mr. Van Kirk, and the 12-man crew of the Enola Gay, would train for six months before deing deployed to Hiroshima. The flight was nine hours from the base at Tinian on the Marianas and Mr. Van Kirk’s navigation (using a compass, map, and sextant) had them arrive at the target only 15 seconds behind schedule.
During his servince in the Army Air Corps Mr. Van Kirk reached the rank of major and earned the Distinguished Flying Cross and a Silver Star. But he kept his most historic flight quiet, not even telling his children until they discovered newspaper clippings in his mother’s attic.
Following the war Mr. Van Kirk attended Bucknell University and worked as a chemical engineer at DuPont.
He did not regret dropping the bomb on Hiroshima. He, like many of his generation, believed that a coming land invasion of Japan by Allied forces would have killed many thousands more. “I honestly believe the use of the atomic bomb saved lives in the long run. There were a lot of lives saved. Most of the lives saved were Japanese.”
When asked about the moral implications of dropping the bomb, Mr. Van Kirk answered, “Where was the morality in the bombing of Coventry, or the bombing of Dresden, or the Bataan Death March, or the Rape of Nanking, or the bombing of Pearl Harbor? I believe that when you’re in a war, a nation must have the courage to do what it must to win the war with a minimum loss of lives.”
Theodore “Dutch” Van Kirk, who was retirement home neighbors with one of the last living crewman of the USS Missouri where the Japanese army officially surrendered, died on July 28, 2014 at the age of 93.
Sources: NY Times, AJC.com, Mental Floss, and Wikipedia
(Image of then-Captain Theodore Van Kirk, Colonel “Birdie” Tibbets, and Major Thomas Ferebee standing next to the Enola Gay in 1945 following their mission to Hiroshima. U.S. Air Force, via Agence France-Press — Getty Images, via The New York Times)
* The plane was named for the pilor, Colonel Paul Tibbets’ mother, Enola Gay.
Other relevant Obit of the Day posts:
Nathan Safferstein - Autographed the atomic bomb
Senji Yamaguchi - Survivor of the Nagasaki bomb who became a voice for disarmament

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Last Crew Member of the Enola Gay

The Enola Gay* was 31,000 feet above Hiroshima on August 6, 1945 at 8:15 a.m. when it released its payload - “Little Boy,” the first atomic bomb. After dropping the bomb, the pilot, Colonel Paul Tibbets, turned the plane and headed back to base in the Mariana Islands.

The crew was told that they had 43 seconds to leave the area before the bomb detonated 1,890 feet in the air over the city of 350,000. Navigator Theodore “Dutch” Van Kirk began counting in his head (“one one-thousand”, “two one-thousand”) and at 43 there was nothing. He and his crew mates thought it was dud. 

Then the cabin filled with a bright light and the "plane jumped and made a sound like sheet metal snapping." Looking back he saw that Hiroshima was no longer visible, "The entire city was covered with smoke and dust and dirt. I describe it looking like a pot of black, boiling tar. You could see some fires burning on the edge of the city.”

Chosen as a military target housing several divisions of the Japanese army as well as serving as a key shipping port, an estimated 70-80,000 residents of Hiroshima were killed by the blast or resultant fires. Another 70,000 men, women, and children were injured. (Thousands later died of radiation poisoning or radiation-related illnesses.) 

Three days later another plane dropped a second atomic bomb (“Fat Man”)  on the city of Nagasaki. The Japanese surrendered that same day. (The official surrender occured on September 1, 1945.)

Mr. Van Kirk joined the Army Air Corps cadet program (a precursor to the U.S. Air Force Academy) just two months before the Japanese bombing at Pearl Harbor. Following his training, he was recruited by Colonel Tibbets as navigator, along with Major Thomas Ferebee as bombadier. 

Together the threesome flew 58 missions during World War II. This included transporting General Dwight Eisenhower to Gibraltar in 1942 for the planning of the Allied invasion of North Africa.

Mr. Van Kirk was reassigned stateside as a training officer after mission 58 but Colonel Tibbets recalled him as part of the newly created 509th Composite Group. The group was formed to specifically handle the transport and delivery of the atomic bomb.

Mr. Van Kirk, and the 12-man crew of the Enola Gay, would train for six months before deing deployed to Hiroshima. The flight was nine hours from the base at Tinian on the Marianas and Mr. Van Kirk’s navigation (using a compass, map, and sextant) had them arrive at the target only 15 seconds behind schedule.

During his servince in the Army Air Corps Mr. Van Kirk reached the rank of major and earned the Distinguished Flying Cross and a Silver Star. But he kept his most historic flight quiet, not even telling his children until they discovered newspaper clippings in his mother’s attic.

Following the war Mr. Van Kirk attended Bucknell University and worked as a chemical engineer at DuPont.

He did not regret dropping the bomb on Hiroshima. He, like many of his generation, believed that a coming land invasion of Japan by Allied forces would have killed many thousands more. “honestly believe the use of the atomic bomb saved lives in the long run. There were a lot of lives saved. Most of the lives saved were Japanese.”

When asked about the moral implications of dropping the bomb, Mr. Van Kirk answered, “Where was the morality in the bombing of Coventry, or the bombing of Dresden, or the Bataan Death March, or the Rape of Nanking, or the bombing of Pearl Harbor? I believe that when you’re in a war, a nation must have the courage to do what it must to win the war with a minimum loss of lives.”

Theodore “Dutch” Van Kirk, who was retirement home neighbors with one of the last living crewman of the USS Missouri where the Japanese army officially surrendered, died on July 28, 2014 at the age of 93.

Sources: NY Times, AJC.com, Mental Floss, and Wikipedia

(Image of then-Captain Theodore Van Kirk, Colonel “Birdie” Tibbets, and Major Thomas Ferebee standing next to the Enola Gay in 1945 following their mission to Hiroshima. U.S. Air Force, via Agence France-Press — Getty Images, via The New York Times)

* The plane was named for the pilor, Colonel Paul Tibbets’ mother, Enola Gay.

Other relevant Obit of the Day posts:

Nathan Safferstein - Autographed the atomic bomb

Senji Yamaguchi - Survivor of the Nagasaki bomb who became a voice for disarmament

Jul 29 '14
"We are waiting here to see if we are meant to live or die. Every day is another day of fear and destruction. If you don’t die, someone you know is likely to be among the dead. This is no life a human being can accept."

A Palestinian commenting on conditions inside Gaza. 

(Via +972 Mag)

(Source: thepoliticalnotebook)

Jul 28 '14

marinaesque:

Darjeeling Limited

Jul 28 '14

xiaoxiaoleslie:

Hallo, this is Thomas Müller!! …and BYE…Cute~ <3 thomasmullerfans thomasmuller13-09-1989 schweinsteiger-army ppper

Jul 28 '14
"The lamps are going out all over Europe, we shall not see them lit again in our life-time"
Sir Edward Grey, Bt

(Source: Wikipedia)

Jul 28 '14

Anonymous asked:

HAPPY BIRTHDAY i assume it's your birthday today bc it's wwi day so

lord-kitschener:

This is the best thing that anyone has ever assumed about me

Jul 28 '14

demons:

Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia, 28 July 1914

It’s one month to the day after Serbian nationalists killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand and the Duchess of Hohenberg that Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia. The action effectively begins the irreversible steps that lead to the Great War, and the destruction of Western Europe.

After a month, Austria-Hungary had determined that a proper measured response to the assassination of their royals was possible military invasion of Serbia. It’s with unconditional support from Germany—the so-called Blank Check assurance on 5 July—that allows Austria-Hungary to present Serbia with an ultimatum on 23 July 1914: the Empire demands a list of things, but among them that all anti-Austrian propaganda within Serbia to be suppressed, and that Austria-Hungary be given full reign of conducting their own investigation into the Archduke’s murder. Serbia grudgingly accepted the terms, only to have the Austrian government break diplomatic relations.

In an effort to stop the building conflict from bursting, the British Foreign Office lobbied in partnership with French officials in Berlin, Paris and Rome to bring the countries to a table. They fail; the German government wants no part in peace. They advise Vienna to go ahead, and when Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia on 28 July 1914, Russia (the protector of the Balkans) fully mobilizes its military. 

That night, Austrian artillery initiate bombardment of Belgrade.

By 1 August 1914, Germany has declared war on Russia.
By 3 August 1914, Germany has declared war on France.

The Great War has begun.

Jul 28 '14

I did it

1 note Tags: i won 1914
Jul 28 '14
theeconomist:

Remembrance: A chart of the first world war’s casualties on the centenary of the outbreak

theeconomist:

Remembrance: A chart of the first world war’s casualties on the centenary of the outbreak

Jul 28 '14

unsecolobreve:

28 July 1914: frontpages