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Indy Ploy

“We do not follow maps to buried treasure and X never, ever marks the spot.”


Obsessed with Catch 22 and the madness of war. Lets reblog some stuff. Like a lot of stuff, no real theme here.
Aug 22 '14
georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

Mexican soldiers man an artillery piece during the Mexican Revolution, c. 1913.
(Fototeca Nacional del INAH)

georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

Mexican soldiers man an artillery piece during the Mexican Revolution, c. 1913.

(Fototeca Nacional del INAH)

Aug 22 '14
demons:

South Vietnamese soldiers of 281 Civilian Irregular Defense Group (CIDG) Infantry Company returning to Bu Prang Special Forces Camp, Quang Duc Province following a search and destroy mission, along with their American Special Forces advisors/23 January 1970.

demons:

South Vietnamese soldiers of 281 Civilian Irregular Defense Group (CIDG) Infantry Company returning to Bu Prang Special Forces Camp, Quang Duc Province following a search and destroy mission, along with their American Special Forces advisors/23 January 1970.

Aug 22 '14

lord-kitschener:

"There currently are 2 bookshelves, 1 armchair, 1 coffee, 1 mirror and 1 table with chair in the room ready for use. But the furniture must not stop there"

But the furniture must not stop there

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god bless denglish

Aug 21 '14

The first British shots of the war were fired early on the morning of the 22nd [of August]. Cavalry from C Squadron of the 4th Royal Irish Dragoon Guards were deployed at the top of a gentle slope about three miles north of the Mons–Condé canal. They saw approaching from a dip ahead of them a German lancer patrol, including an officer smoking a cigar. Capt. Charles Hornby led two troops cantering down the road, sparks flying from the cobbles, in pursuit of the enemy, who took flight. There was a mêlée a mile on, in which the British took five prisoners from the startled Germans, hampered by their lances. Cpl. Ted Thomas used his rifle: after years on the ranges, where one waited several seconds for a paper target to be marked, he was amazed by the promptness with which a German horseman dropped from his saddle – the first enemy to fall to a British bullet. Hornby returned exultant, reporting that his own victim had died like a gentleman, at the point of a sword. He gave his weapon to the regimental armourer to be sharpened, expressing idiot regret at the necessity to have the blood wiped off. His brigadier had promised a DSO to the first officer to kill a German with the new pattern cavalry sword, and Hornby duly received this decoration.

Catastrophe 1914 by Max Hastings

Pictured above:

http://www.inthefootsteps.com/blog/the-battle-of-mons-the-first-shot/

http://brightonmuseums-ww1-war-stories.tumblr.com/post/77923015513/on-the-morning-of-august-22-1914-ernest-edward

http://longwaytotipperary.ul.ie/the-military/4th-royal-irish-dragoon-guards/meet-dragoons/4dg-capt-charles-hornby/

Aug 21 '14
scrapironflotilla:

French soldiers wearing First World War-era uniforms parade on the Champs Elysees during the annual Bastille Day military parade in Paris, on July 14. 
As the vast majority of WW1 era photos we see are black and white, it’s often hard to imagine how they should look. Every so often it’s good to have a reminder that the War, and all of pre-colour history, looked as vibrant and real as life today.

scrapironflotilla:

French soldiers wearing First World War-era uniforms parade on the Champs Elysees during the annual Bastille Day military parade in Paris, on July 14. 

As the vast majority of WW1 era photos we see are black and white, it’s often hard to imagine how they should look. Every so often it’s good to have a reminder that the War, and all of pre-colour history, looked as vibrant and real as life today.

(Source: gettyimages.com)

Aug 19 '14
tlcplmax:

History in the making.

As a historian and museum professional, let me try to explain a bit. From the blog post for reference below.

So anyway, Civil War reenactments.
I was always admittedly creeped out by these things a little. It’s like a bunch of people dressing up as guys that are dead and reenacting what was possibly the most traumatic and terrifying part of their lives. I also always wondered where the line was for reenacting. Is it a green light once everyone in that particular conflict is officially dead? Is that the line? This comic is only partly accurate, mostly because I’m sure if they ever did do an Iraq War Reenactment or some such, I imagine it would be exclusive to the more action-packed segments, of which I certainly wouldn’t be portrayed in.
In any case, I fully understand that these reenactments are treated with reverence and respect for the events they depict.
What I do not understand, is why people in the South seem to want to watch themselves lose so many times.

I was recently involved in designing a program for grade school students at our teaching museum where we did a bit of living history and reenactment. We brought the students and had them take on the role of someone volunteering for service with the union army. We had them go through an enlistment ceremony, a period medical inquiry, let them try on a uniform, and even showed them a bit of musketry with a real black powder muzzle loader before teaching them a bit of marching skills.
I was one of designers of the program, and I was one of the staff who ran the program itself. I took the role of the recruiting captain and the musketry instructor. There was some initial push against having a program where children were enlisted into the army and had the opportunity to handle a musket. The reason I and two others working on the project pushed so hard for a reenactment and living history section was to show the students a realistic picture of the past. We wanted to let them not only read about it, but see and live the past. Those kids will remember how real and heavy a musket is a lot longer than they will remember some statistic they pull out of Wikipedia for a class paper.

tlcplmax:

History in the making.

As a historian and museum professional, let me try to explain a bit. From the blog post for reference below.

So anyway, Civil War reenactments.

I was always admittedly creeped out by these things a little. It’s like a bunch of people dressing up as guys that are dead and reenacting what was possibly the most traumatic and terrifying part of their lives. I also always wondered where the line was for reenacting. Is it a green light once everyone in that particular conflict is officially dead? Is that the line? This comic is only partly accurate, mostly because I’m sure if they ever did do an Iraq War Reenactment or some such, I imagine it would be exclusive to the more action-packed segments, of which I certainly wouldn’t be portrayed in.

In any case, I fully understand that these reenactments are treated with reverence and respect for the events they depict.

What I do not understand, is why people in the South seem to want to watch themselves lose so many times.

I was recently involved in designing a program for grade school students at our teaching museum where we did a bit of living history and reenactment. We brought the students and had them take on the role of someone volunteering for service with the union army. We had them go through an enlistment ceremony, a period medical inquiry, let them try on a uniform, and even showed them a bit of musketry with a real black powder muzzle loader before teaching them a bit of marching skills.

I was one of designers of the program, and I was one of the staff who ran the program itself. I took the role of the recruiting captain and the musketry instructor. There was some initial push against having a program where children were enlisted into the army and had the opportunity to handle a musket. The reason I and two others working on the project pushed so hard for a reenactment and living history section was to show the students a realistic picture of the past. We wanted to let them not only read about it, but see and live the past. Those kids will remember how real and heavy a musket is a lot longer than they will remember some statistic they pull out of Wikipedia for a class paper.

Aug 18 '14
footieridiculosity:

Thomas updates his adoring audience on his interest in sleep schedules and inability to not speak German (x)

footieridiculosity:

Thomas updates his adoring audience on his interest in sleep schedules and inability to not speak German (x)

Aug 17 '14

The Wonderful World of Albert Kahn

donnaimmaculata:

Hey, illustrate-her, since you’ve been posting WWI pictures lately, it just occurred to me: are you familiar with Albert Kahn?

He was a French banker and philanthropist who launched a huge photographic project in about 1910: The Archives of the Planet. He trained and sent out photographers to take colour (!) photographs of people(s) in Europe and then around the globe. When the First World War broke out, his photographers documented life in the trenches. Here are some of the autochromes from the WWI portfolio:

image

Bike courier, lunching, France 1917

image

Bulgarian, arrested by Greek soldiers on Mt. Athos

image

Infirmary, France 1916

image

image

image

French soldiers in the trenches

image

Reims, 1917

Pre-WWI photos include:

image

Tattooed Bosnian Catholic woman

image

Mongolian hunter

image

Italian girl

It’s a huge collection of the earliest colour photographs, and it’s absolutely astonishing. There’s also a BBC documentary, “Edwardians in Colour”, and a book, “The Wonderful World of Albert Kahn”.

http://www.albertkahn.co.uk/

Aug 15 '14

georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

Russian forces on parade, around the time of the outbreak of World War I. While possessing an immense army - 1,423,000 standing strength, nearly twice Germany’s - and the ability to mobilize millions of reserves, Imperial Russia’s military philosophy could be summarized as quantity over quality.

(Hulton-Getty)

Aug 15 '14
johanvandemerwe:

John Alexander Brett of the 241st Battalion (Canadian Scottish Borderers) Killed in Action September 27th 1918

johanvandemerwe:

John Alexander Brett of the 241st Battalion (Canadian Scottish Borderers) Killed in Action September 27th 1918

(Source: hangingonalimb.wordpress.com)