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Indy Ploy

“We do not follow maps to buried treasure and X never, ever marks the spot.”


Obsessed with Catch 22 and the madness of war. Lets reblog some stuff. Like a lot of stuff, no real theme here.
Sep 2 '14
livefastdieyounghegelian:

treebeardoffangorn:

sexpigeon:

"I drove a tank in World War II, isn’t that interesting? I drove a tank and I loved that tank and everyone in it. I drove it over people and right through houses, and I did it out of love."
Love of country?
"No, love of my tank and of everyone in it. There are no finer conversations than those had in the grinding innards of an iron tank. You have a lot to learn. You will find your tank. It just takes time."

I read this all in a heavy slavic accent and it sounds natural

Destruction and passion come naturally to my people.

livefastdieyounghegelian:

treebeardoffangorn:

sexpigeon:

"I drove a tank in World War II, isn’t that interesting? I drove a tank and I loved that tank and everyone in it. I drove it over people and right through houses, and I did it out of love."

Love of country?

"No, love of my tank and of everyone in it. There are no finer conversations than those had in the grinding innards of an iron tank. You have a lot to learn. You will find your tank. It just takes time."

I read this all in a heavy slavic accent and it sounds natural

Destruction and passion come naturally to my people.

Sep 2 '14
scrapironflotilla:

Corbie, France. 31 March 1918. Informal portrait of British cavalrymen cleaning up at Corbie after several days’ hard fighting. Note the initials XV HRS on the door on the left, most likely denoting billeting arrangements.

scrapironflotilla:

Corbie, France. 31 March 1918. Informal portrait of British cavalrymen cleaning up at Corbie after several days’ hard fighting. Note the initials XV HRS on the door on the left, most likely denoting billeting arrangements.

(Source: awm.gov.au)

Sep 1 '14
demons:


Warsaw after being bombed repeatedly by the Luftwaffe, September 1939

73 years ago on the morning of 1 September 1939, a German army of 1.25 million men, including six armored divisions and eight motorized divisions with armored units, crossed the border into Poland behind a heavy aerial bombardment. History knows this invasion by the name of German operation title of Case White or in Poland as the 1939 Defensive War.Hitler had ranted about Danzig and the Polish Corridor, but the northern wing of his attack headed for Warsaw, while the southern wing swept through Krakow and Lodz.Although the Polish Army would have outnumbered the attacking German army—the Wehrmacht—once it had all been mustered, instead the German army were met by 17 ill-equipped infantry divisions. The Poles had just one armored brigade-660 tanks in all, versus Germany 2,100. In some cases Polish Calvary units were utilized but never against Panzer Brigades, instead they were used as messengers between the light infantry—though the myth (propagated by both the Germans and Russians) of the “last calvary charge in history” still persists. In the air, the Polish Air Force had just 842 obsolete aircraft; the German Luftwaffe could put 4700 modern aircraft in the air, trained in the same tactics that destroyed Guernica, Spain.In just seven days, the Panzers reached Warsaw.To make matters worse, on 17 September the Red Army moved across Poland’s eastern border to occupy the 76000 square miles of land, with its population of 12.8 million, promised under the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact. The act was condemned internationally and the Soviet Union was expelled by the useless League of Nations but the damage was done. By the end of September the invasion of Poland was complete and Case White was a success. The Polish government, left with no choice and with its allies—France and Britain—acting too late, fled into Romania.In the first month of the Second World War alone some 60,000 Poles were dead, 200,000 injured and 700,000 taken prisoner.

demons:

Warsaw after being bombed repeatedly by the Luftwaffe, September 1939

73 years ago on the morning of 1 September 1939, a German army of 1.25 million men, including six armored divisions and eight motorized divisions with armored units, crossed the border into Poland behind a heavy aerial bombardment. History knows this invasion by the name of German operation title of Case White or in Poland as the 1939 Defensive War.

Hitler had ranted about Danzig and the Polish Corridor, but the northern wing of his attack headed for Warsaw, while the southern wing swept through Krakow and Lodz.

Although the Polish Army would have outnumbered the attacking German army—the Wehrmacht—once it had all been mustered, instead the German army were met by 17 ill-equipped infantry divisions. The Poles had just one armored brigade-660 tanks in all, versus Germany 2,100. In some cases Polish Calvary units were utilized but never against Panzer Brigades, instead they were used as messengers between the light infantry—though the myth (propagated by both the Germans and Russians) of the “last calvary charge in history” still persists. In the air, the Polish Air Force had just 842 obsolete aircraft; the German Luftwaffe could put 4700 modern aircraft in the air, trained in the same tactics that destroyed Guernica, Spain.

In just seven days, the Panzers reached Warsaw.

To make matters worse, on 17 September the Red Army moved across Poland’s eastern border to occupy the 76000 square miles of land, with its population of 12.8 million, promised under the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact. The act was condemned internationally and the Soviet Union was expelled by the useless League of Nations but the damage was done. By the end of September the invasion of Poland was complete and Case White was a success. The Polish government, left with no choice and with its allies—France and Britain—acting too late, fled into Romania.

In the first month of the Second World War alone some 60,000 Poles were dead, 200,000 injured and 700,000 taken prisoner.

Aug 31 '14

"Oh no oh no oh no…. goodbye my love. It was nice knowing you."

Aug 29 '14
possumtours:

This brick outside the WWII museum caught my eye. I decided to think about Eddie Simpson. I didn’t think I’d ever learn, but a few moments on the life of a forgotten serviceman, a faceless name, couldn’t hurt. I took a picture of the name, thought about it as I walked to the car, thought about him, Eddie Simpson, as I drove home. “There had to have been more than one Edward Simpson,” I thought.I googled the exact quote from the brick and found that a man, WIlliam Overstreet, who, in 1944, flew under the arches of the Eiffel tower to shoot down a German plane had died in December, 2013. William Overstreet. WBO.A few google searches with both names lead me to Eddie Simpson’s story. After walking away from the crash of his P-51 Mustang, Simpson died to save the lives of French Resistance fighters; men and women he barely knew and with whom he could not converse.  Read: The Stars and Stripes account of Eddie Simpson’s last day.I remember Eddie Simpson.

possumtours:

This brick outside the WWII museum caught my eye. I decided to think about Eddie Simpson. I didn’t think I’d ever learn, but a few moments on the life of a forgotten serviceman, a faceless name, couldn’t hurt. 

I took a picture of the name, thought about it as I walked to the car, thought about him, Eddie Simpson, as I drove home. “There had to have been more than one Edward Simpson,” I thought.

I googled the exact quote from the brick and found that a man, WIlliam Overstreet, who, in 1944, flew under the arches of the Eiffel tower to shoot down a German plane had died in December, 2013. William Overstreet. WBO.

A few google searches with both names lead me to Eddie Simpson’s story. After walking away from the crash of his P-51 Mustang, Simpson died to save the lives of French Resistance fighters; men and women he barely knew and with whom he could not converse.  

Read: The Stars and Stripes account of Eddie Simpson’s last day.

I remember Eddie Simpson.

Aug 28 '14

demons:

The Normandy defenses, photographed 6/7 May 1944

Aug 28 '14

why is tumblr logging me out incessantly. Why does my news feed suddenly end in broken posts with a login page attached. THE WORLD WILL NEVER KNOW.

Aug 26 '14

(Source: dogsonline)

Aug 25 '14
bantarleton:

British infantry at the Mons-Condé Canal, August 22nd 1914. 

bantarleton:

British infantry at the Mons-Condé Canal, August 22nd 1914. 

Aug 25 '14

It’s time to learn again kiddies. Hope you’re not too hung over after trashing campus every night since Thursday.

Tags: shitlords