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Indy Ploy

“We do not follow maps to buried treasure and X never, ever marks the spot.”


Obsessed with Catch 22 and the madness of war. Lets reblog some stuff. Like a lot of stuff, no real theme here.
Jul 22 '14

I just solved racism right there guys

You’re all welcome

Jul 22 '14

~ (✿◠‿◠) ~ Friendly reminder, don’t commit genocide! ~ (✿◠‿◠) ~

Jul 22 '14
krogantesticles:

micdotcom:

German soccer star Mesut Özil donates his $400K World Cup bonus 

Mesut Özil, the midfielder for Germany’s World Cup-winning team, just set an example that all stars need to see.
After Germany won the final, each player received a bonus of more than $400,000. (Spain, for instance, had proposed a $980,000 winning bonus, to great outcry.) Instead of keeping his portion, however, Özil donated it all to support the surgeries of sick Brazilian children.
Read more | Follow micdotcom


Props to the German team for being actual amazing human beings too (which nobody seems to talk about on German TV)

krogantesticles:

micdotcom:

German soccer star Mesut Özil donates his $400K World Cup bonus 

Mesut Özil, the midfielder for Germany’s World Cup-winning team, just set an example that all stars need to see.

After Germany won the final, each player received a bonus of more than $400,000. (Spain, for instance, had proposed a $980,000 winning bonus, to great outcry.) Instead of keeping his portion, however, Özil donated it all to support the surgeries of sick Brazilian children.

Read more | Follow micdotcom

Props to the German team for being actual amazing human beings too (which nobody seems to talk about on German TV)

Jul 22 '14
globalvoices:


Mugu, one of the poorest districts in Nepal, doesn’t have a single football stadium. But it does have a star football player as revered as Argentina’s famous son Lionel Messi – and she happens to be a girl.
Sunakali and her team were welcomed home there after winning the women’s national football tournament as if they had won the World Cup in Brazil, reported Mysansar, a popular Nepalese blog.
The young women left their mountainous district for the first time to compete in the tournament in Kailali, a journey of hundreds of kilometers. They walked two days to reach the airstrip, and travelled in a plane, rickshaw and bullock cart for the very first time in their lives. There are no direct roads between Kailali and Mugu, and the ones that do exist are in poor condition.
At the tournament, the Mugu team played with Badikhel Team of Lalitpur district, Baliya Team of Kailali and Team Patharaiya before meeting with Team Tikapur in the finals. Team Mugu won and Sunakali was named the best striker.
It was an impressive achievement for many reasons, including the fact that the young women were only introduced to the sport in 2011. In Mugu, the average life expectancy is reported to be 47 years, with men at 49 and women at 39. Nearly two-thirds of girls aged 15 to 19 are married, and female literacy rate stands at 9 percent. 
When the victorious team returned, locals met them at the airstrip chanting, “Sunakali, like Messi!” Horses were arranged for the young women to ride back to the village, an honor in Mugu where it is unusual for women to ride the animals. 

This Young Woman Footballer Is More Popular Than Messi in Her Remote Village in Nepal

globalvoices:

Mugu, one of the poorest districts in Nepal, doesn’t have a single football stadium. But it does have a star football player as revered as Argentina’s famous son Lionel Messi – and she happens to be a girl.

Sunakali and her team were welcomed home there after winning the women’s national football tournament as if they had won the World Cup in Brazil, reported Mysansar, a popular Nepalese blog.

The young women left their mountainous district for the first time to compete in the tournament in Kailali, a journey of hundreds of kilometers. They walked two days to reach the airstrip, and travelled in a plane, rickshaw and bullock cart for the very first time in their lives. There are no direct roads between Kailali and Mugu, and the ones that do exist are in poor condition.

At the tournament, the Mugu team played with Badikhel Team of Lalitpur district, Baliya Team of Kailali and Team Patharaiya before meeting with Team Tikapur in the finals. Team Mugu won and Sunakali was named the best striker.

It was an impressive achievement for many reasons, including the fact that the young women were only introduced to the sport in 2011. In Mugu, the average life expectancy is reported to be 47 years, with men at 49 and women at 39. Nearly two-thirds of girls aged 15 to 19 are married, and female literacy rate stands at 9 percent. 

When the victorious team returned, locals met them at the airstrip chanting, “Sunakali, like Messi!” Horses were arranged for the young women to ride back to the village, an honor in Mugu where it is unusual for women to ride the animals. 

This Young Woman Footballer Is More Popular Than Messi in Her Remote Village in Nepal

Jul 22 '14
demons:

Back view of a full kit carried in front line by American infantry.

demons:

Back view of a full kit carried in front line by American infantry.

Jul 22 '14
firebombing:

A US army source, talking about napalm, reported
‘We sure are pleased with those backroom boys at Dow. The original product wasn’t so hot - if the gooks were quick they could scrape it off. So the boys started adding polystyrene - now it sticks like shit to a blanket. But if the gooks jumped under water it stopped burning, so they started adding Willie Peter (white phosphorus) so’s to make it burn better. And just one drop is enough, it’ll keep on burning right down to the bone so they die anyway from phosphorus poisoning.’

firebombing:

A US army source, talking about napalm, reported

‘We sure are pleased with those backroom boys at Dow. The original product wasn’t so hot - if the gooks were quick they could scrape it off. So the boys started adding polystyrene - now it sticks like shit to a blanket. But if the gooks jumped under water it stopped burning, so they started adding Willie Peter (white phosphorus) so’s to make it burn better. And just one drop is enough, it’ll keep on burning right down to the bone so they die anyway from phosphorus poisoning.’

Jul 21 '14
I still don’t think you grasp this concept of “clean your shit up that I’ve been trying to tell you about.

I still don’t think you grasp this concept of “clean your shit up that I’ve been trying to tell you about.

Jul 21 '14
Jul 21 '14

1863-project:

In case anyone is wondering what archivists actually do when they say they’re processing collections and writing finding aids, here’s me doing it. And making stupid faces because I like doing that, too.

When you get a collection to process that’s been in the archives for a while, it generally comes in an acid-free box. Oftentimes there will be subfolders within the box. When a new collection comes in, you often just get stacks of paper thrown into a random box and have to make the folders yourself and rehouse fragile materials and documents in acid-free folders and boxes before getting started (including removing staples and paper clips in some cases). In this case, I’m processing a collection that’s been here for a while, so it’s already in folders.

The next step is going through each folder to determine exactly what’s in the collection. This helps you choose information to put into the finding aid. I usually take very extensive notes during this step because I take very extensive notes on everything ever, but whatever helps you remember what’s in each folder is fine.

Once you know what’s in all your folders, you can move on to working on making the collection accessible for researchers. The collection I’m currently working on in these photos is a bit disjointed, so right now I’m rehousing some of the individual pieces into folders that make more sense for them to be in. You usually don’t do this unless you have to - there’s something called original order that means that you try to keep things in the order the creator of the collection had them in - but sometimes things are rearranged slightly for researchers, especially if there appears to be no significance to the order the documents are in.

Now it’s time to put together our finding aid. To do that, we use a form document so all our finding aids are consistent. We put in all the metadata information - gross, I know - and then fill out container and box lists. Those work like this:

  • Series: A subdivision of a collection that is self-contained (not physically as some series are really long)
  • Box: Sometimes collections physically come in more than one box, so list the box number
  • Folder: Each folder in a series gets a number so that the files stay organized
  • Notes, encompassing dates, etc.

So as you can see, there’s a reason I take all those notes when I’m going through the collection - when I add something to the ‘notes’ section, it’s usually about anything important in the folder so that a researcher can find it with a keyword search when the finding aid goes online!

And that is what an archivist is doing when they tell you they’re processing a collection or writing a finding aid.

Jul 21 '14

(Source: factota)